UJ Astroparticle Physics Group Page


Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope Study of extremely energetic cosmic rays; gamma rays and neutrinos, produced naturally at astrophysical sources, is the main research area of the Astroparticle Physics Group at the University of Johannesburg. These tiny subatomic particles can reach the kinetic energy of a cricket ball delivered by a fast bowler. Even the largest man-made machine, the Large Hadron Collider at the CERN in Switzerland, is unable to accelerate particles to this energy. Modeling how these cosmic particles gain energy, interact and propagate to the Earth are some of the research topics of the Astroparticle Physics Group at UJ. The group currently uses data from NASA’s Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, which is a worldwide collaboration of over 19 countries in 6 continents, as well as from the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, the world’s largest neutrino telescope located at the geographic South Pole in Antarctica.
Artist's concept of Cherenkov Telescope Array The UJ Astroparticle Physics Group is also a member of the International Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) Consortium and the South African Gamma-ray Astronomy Programme (SA-GAMMA). Currently UJ, University of the Free State, North-West University, South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) and Witwatersrand University are members of the SA-GAMMA, which is sponsored by the South African Department of Science and Technology.
IceCube Neutrino Observatory Research at UJ Astroparticle Physics Group
Main research: Theory, Computation and Data Modeling
Research topics: Gamma-ray and Neutrino Astrophysics of Gamma-Ray Bursts, Active Galactic Nuclei and Supernovae; Modeling extragalactic background radiation; Cosmic-ray Physics; Neutrino Oscillation Physics
Facilities: Fermi Large Area space Telescope (Fermi-LAT); IceCube Neutrino Observatory; Cherenkov Telescope Array (in future)
  Contact: srazzaque at uj dot ac dot za